border disputes

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Venezuela Appears to be Closing in on the Essequibo, but Here’s Why You Shouldn’t Worry

For months leading up to their infamous December 3 sham referendum, the Venezuelan government has been threatening to annex the Essequibo while ramping up troops and military equipment close to the border with Guyana. Even after CARICOM brokered peace talks and the signing of the Argyle agreement by Presidents of both countries, satellite images, international intelligence, and other hard evidence show that Venezuela has not slowed its military advances on the Essequibo, nor has it retracted its claim to it. In fact, right now, the official Venezuelan map includes the Essequibo as part of Venezuela – a flagrant move by the Maduro regime which can hopefully be rolled back after a change of Venezuelan government. But whether Maduro will even allow free and fair elections in Venezuela is highly doubtful.

Is Nicolas Maduro Daring Enough to Test the Resolve of the United Kingdom?

While Venezuela may have spent a lot of money building up its military, it is no position to sustain a full scale war. With its stockpile of 5,000 Russian-made MANPADS surface-to-air weapons, Venezuela may be very capable of defending itself against an attack and stave off an incursion into its own territory. But while its defense capability may be strong, its collapsed economy has weakened the military’s attack capabilities. In spite of this, Venezuela’s dictator president, Nicolas Maduro, is threatening to annex the Essequibo region of Guyana and occupy it by force.

A Drowning Maduro is Attempting to Take Guyana Down With Him

Maduro’s philosophy right now seems to be, “if I’m going down, I’m taking some people down with me.” And those include leaders, civilians, and soldiers in both Guyana and Venezuela. Since the Chavista took office in 2013, he has done nothing good for the people of Venezuela. He has heartlessly overseen mass migration, unprecedented inflation of the Venezuelan currency, medical and food shortages, and the overall suffering of the Venezuelan people.

Guyana Cannot Depend on Brazil for Military Support if Venezuela Invades

It is unlikely that the current Brazilian government, headed by Lula Da Silva, will give military support to Guyana in the event of an invasion by Venezuela. In fact, “unlikely” is a bit of an understatement. It is almost certain that Brazil, on its current stance and trajectory, will render any sort of military assistance to Guyana in the event of a Venezuelan incursion into Guyana.

How Nicolas Maduro is Using the Essequibo as a Political Ploy to Cling to Power

There’s just about three days left before Venezuela’s 3rd of December referendum which seeks to ratify the support of the Venezuelan people for forcefully annexing the Essequibo county of Guyana and making it into a new state within the country of Venezuela. While the Guyana Government has petitioned the ICJ to issue a ruling that confirms the illegality of such a move, and the court is scheduled to do so on Friday, December, 1, 2023, president of Venezuela, Nicolas Maduro, has said that that won’t stop him from flooding the Essequibo with Venezuelan soldiers and civilians and demarcating new boundaries for Venezuela after the referendum.

Brazilian Media Officially Confirms Military Reinforcements on the Venezuela/Brazil Border

Brazil’s largest and most reputable media house, Globo, has officially confirmed on the afternoon of Tuesday, November, 29th, 2023, that Brazilian military reinforcements were being sent to the border between Venezuela and Brazil and Pacaraima to protect the citizens of Brazil in the event of a war between Venezuela and Guyana, or if Venezuela invades Guyana with low to no resistance.

Brazil Moves Troops, Military Equipment to its Border with Venezuela Amidst Fears that Venezuela Might Invade Guyana

The Brazilian Army went on alert in the early hours of Saturday, 25th of November, 2023 after receiving intelligence information about a possible intention to invade Guyana from Venezuela, which would require the passage of troops through Brazilian territory. As a precaution, the High Command began the emergency mobilization of troops to the border.

Brazilian Mediation Fails to Halt Maduro’s December 3 Referendum

As of today, 26th of November, 2023, exactly one week is left before the Maduro Regime executes is referendum whereby Venezuelan citizens go to the polls to vote on whether or not they want the government to annex the Essequibo county of Guyana into Venezuelan territory. The Venezuelan military has been activated and put on full alert. Its mandate is to “defend the Essequibo” after the presumably successful December 3 referendum.

Dr. Jagdeo Says All Options Are On the Table as Guyana Braces for a Possible Venezuelan Invasion

For far too long, the Guyana Government has simply shrugged at the thought of Venezuela invading the Essequibo and occupying it, but in recent days, they seem to be taking it a bit more seriously. Vice President, Dr. Bharrat Jagdeo, in a press conference yesterday, 23rd of November, 2023, said that all options are on the table for protecting Guyana from a Venezuelan invasion of the Essequibo, and this includes use of force.

GDF Bans Officers from Leaving Country as Fears of a Venezuela Incursion Grow

The Guyana Government, through the Guyana Defense Force, has confined all GDF officers to remain within the country’s borders as of yesterday, 16th of November, 2023. This move came as tensions between Guyana and neighboring Venezuela intensifies, nurturing fears of a possible war between the two countries. Further, the GDF is ramping troops and military equipment near to Guyana’s border with Venezuela.

A Venezuelan Incursion into Guyana is Now a Real and Present Danger

For years, Guyanese have trivialized the idea of Venezuela annexing the Essequibo and seizing it by force. We’ve made fun and jokes about it. After all, the probability of Venezuela making such a bold and daring move seemed laughably small. Since the early 2000s, Venezuela was beset by internal political turmoils and a looming economic crisis with which it is still wrestling, so invading Guyana was not a top priority.

Guyana Government’s Statement on Venezuela’s December 3 Referendum Seeking to Annex the Essequibo

Among other questions, all of which are intended to further Venezuela’s unlawful and unfounded claim to more than two-thirds of Guyana’s national territory, question five is the most pernicious: it brazenly seeks the approval of the Venezuelan people of the creation of a new Venezuelan State consisting of Guyana’s Essequibo Region, which would be incorporated into the national territory of Venezuela, and the granting of Venezuelan citizenship to the population.

Does Venezuela Really Have a Legitimate Claim to the Essequibo?

While the tyrannical Maduro dictatorship regime and its media cheerleaders are beating the drums of war, the question arises: is this a complete act of bullyism or does Venezuela really have a legitimate claim to the Essequibo? From a patriotic standpoint, I’d say, “No. Venezuela has no claim to the Essequibo.” However, from a neutral standpoint, I’d have to admit that it does.

Venezuela Accuses Guyana Government of Being “Hostile” and Advises it to Avoid “Escalation of a Conflict”

Since the discovery of humungous reserves of sweet light crude off the shores of Guyana in 2015, a sleeping monster has once again reared its ugly head. The Guyana/Venezuela border dispute dates back centuries but was settled by the British through the Arbitral Award of 1899 which handed the disputed territory to Great Britain in what was then British Guiana.

1932 Venezuelan Stamp Proves that the Essequibo Was Never Part of Venezuela

As the Venezuelan people and government continue their ramblings over Guyana’s Essequibo territory, the Guyanese people are firmly resolved to holding their ground with their unified and resounding “not one blade of grass” song to the Venezuelans. But a 90-year-old Venezuelan stamp restates what we as Guyanese have known all along – that the Essequibo was never part of Venezuela, and that Caracas was never keen on claiming the Essequibo prior the 2015 oil discovery in Guyana’s waters.